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ABOUT THE
BLACK IN SCHOOL COALITION

Established in 2022 during the introduction of AB 2774 (Weber), the Black in School Coalition works relentlessly toward an educational system that is funded and structured so that California’s Black students will have full access to a high quality 21st century education and will graduate from our public schools fully prepared for success in college and career.
 

We are a statewide advocacy coalition consisting of organizations from all parts of the education community including teachers, administrators, local school district and county board of education trustees, parents, civil rights, and faith groups. 
 

Members of our coalition come together around the goal of improving academic and social outcomes for Black students and promoting equitable educational policy.

ABOUT AB 2774

AB 2774 would've fixed a fundamental flaw in the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) by creating a new supplemental grant for California’s lowest-performing subgroup of students not currently receiving funding, which continue to be African American students. AB 2774 was authored by Assemblymembers Dr. Akilah Weber (D-San Diego) and Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) and was sponsored by the Fortune School of Education. 

 

The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) was enacted in 2013 and was designed to be a more equitable system of funding, with the goal of providing additional funding for the highest-needs students. Base grants, concentration grants, and supplemental grants were created to provide additional funding and accountability to Lead Educational Agencies (LEAs) including school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to provide extra support for high-needs students. These subgroups of students include English Language Learners, low-income students, and foster/homeless youth.

 

Most recently available data from the California Department of Education show that African American students continue to be the lowest-performing subgroup with 70% not meeting English Language Arts Standards and 84% not meeting Math Standards.

AB 2774 was unanimously supported in the State Assembly and Senate but was shelved by the primary author at Governor Gavin Newsom's request.

HOW ARE CALIFORNIA'S STUDENTS PERFORMING?

MATH
SCIENCE
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NON-LOW-INCOME BLACK
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Approximately 80,000 African American students or just over a quarter are not receiving additional supplemental funding or accountability through the LCFF. Unfunded African American students are the only subgroup performing below the statewide average on ELA and Math that is not already receiving an LCFF supplement. That is to say that while the entirety of the current subgroups in the unduplicated pupil count receives supplemental funding, only a portion of the lowest-performing subgroup realizes this benefit.

About AB 2744

THESE STUDENTS NEED EQUITABLE FUNDING NOW!

Promotes Academic Growth

Supports African American Students for College and Career-Readiness 

Drives Equitable Education Funding for African American Students

MEMBERS OF THE

BLACK IN SCHOOL COALITION

FORTUNE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

ELITE PUBLIC SCHOOLS

CHILDREN NOW

A BLACK EDUCATION NETWORK

NATIONAL ACTION NETWORK, Western Region

NATIONAL ACTION NETWORK, Sacramento

NAACP SAN BERNARDINO

AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT COUNCIL

ALPHA COMMUNITY EDUCATION INITIATIVE

NATIONAL COALITION OF 100 BLACK WOMEN SACRAMENTO

BLACK STUDENTS OF CALIFORNIA UNITED

BLACK AMERICAN POLITICAL ASSOCIATION OF CA, San Diego

BLU EDUCATION FOUNDATION

CENTER FOR POWERFUL PUBLIC SCHOOLS

SHE POWER

AB 2774 Supporters

WHICH LOCAL EDUCATION AGENCIES WILL BENEFIT?

An estimated 785 districts will gain new funding under this proposal, providing an estimated $400 million to unfunded African American students. Below are the top 10 districts and the estimated funds generated by this legislation if passed.

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FIND OUT HOW MUCH YOUR DISTRICT WILL GAIN

In the Tableau below, first select your county, then the school district, and if desired, your specific school.

IS YOUR ORGANIZATION INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR COALITION?

FAQ AB 2774

Frequently Asked Questions

Everything you need to know about LCFF and how AB 2774(Weber) can help serve African American students across the state of California

What is the Local Control Funding Formula?

The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) was enacted in 2013 and was a complete restructure of education funding in California. With the Local Control Funding Formula, three of California’s highest needs student populations receive supplemental funding for additional support: English Language Learners, low-income students, and Foster or Homeless Youth. All of California’s public schools are held to higher levels of accountability to improve the academic performance of these subgroups. Despite chronic underperformance, African American students are not identified as a high needs population for funding.

How much additional funding would this result in?

We estimate that approximately 80,000 additional African American students would generate additional funding. These are African American students who are not currently already receiving an LCFF supplement through being low-income, English Language Learners, or foster/homeless youth. This proposal would generate approximately $400 million in additional supplemental grant funds to support students in the lowest-performing subgroup not already receiving an LCFF supplement.

How is the lowest performing subgroup identified in this proposal?

The Superintendent of Public Instruction would be required to annually identify the lowest-performing subgroup statewide. Currently, this subgroup is African American students. This excludes subgroups that already generate supplemental funding: English Language Learners, low-income students, and homeless/foster youth. This also excludes Special Education students since they are specifically funded.

What if the lowest performing subgroup changes?

If the current lowest-performing subgroup increases its performance above the next lowest performing subgroup, that subgroup would generate additional supplemental funding. The original subgroup would continue to be grandfathered into the formula and would continue to receive supplemental funds until it meets or exceeds the highest performing subgroup in the state.

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS 

CALL TO ACTION

TEMPLATE BOARD RESOLUTION

TEMPLATE LETTER OF SUPPORT

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